Matter of Matters ᴹᴹ


       


   






   




question of matter

matter of question
substance of meaning
purpose of substance
meaning of reason
matter of everything







































       







Matter of Matters is a synthetic physico-linguistical theory, which regards language as matter with physical properties. This matter forms everything in the world, obeys physical laws and can be researched and analysed by methods of natural sciences.






























The stream
of consciousness
is the flow of thoughts in the conscious mind.    




















SPEECH = LIQUID




A dynamic and fluent state, speech constantly changes its shape but cannot be as unlimited as thought. It has certain volume and weight. It is the most ‘acoustic’ state of all which forms waves like normal liquid. It is also the most ‘acoustic’ state of all. Speech and thought much easier absorb molecules (words) from another languages and change much faster. Nevertheless these changes are rapid and do not last long, unless they are not sealed in the solid state. It is also much easier to manipulate with foreign language matter in its liquid state.




















































   ↘ fragments of solid texts

















THOUGHT = GAS




One of the basic states of language matter. Described as something non-material, amorphous, infinitely expanding. It is shapeless but can take any shape and fill any volume, it is non-material, almost untouchable, ungraspable. A thought or an idea can fill the whole available volume, spread over big distances and get through tiny holes. Just like compressed gas, a suppressed thought can be dangerous and explosive.



























































Keep the conversation
flowing freely.




























































It's on
the books,
set in stone.

























































Comparison of sound diagrams:
Croud of people talking / Small water stream












































TEXT = SOLID




The least dynamic and the most steady state. Originally not so flexible and easy to change as the first two, but the firmest one. In solid form, texts can stay unchanged in the same condition for hundreds years. Solid language matter can be easily collected and preserved. A thousand years old solid stone plate with carved text is the typical and the simplest example of it and the core of human culture.








MM-theory
reacts on
digitalization and
dematerializiation processes currently happening
in our lives.















































































      








                                                                                                                       
 













Can we change our understanding
of language by investigating it
with methods of natural sciences?





















An attempt
at materialization
of a core of human communication:
a language.



↘ origins of matter
    

Fig. 1.
Phase transitions of language











































Fig. 3.
Technical devices for registration,
transmission and synthesis.








Fig. 2.
Human devices for registration,
transmission and synthesis. 

























                        

















 “Words are constantly buffeted by opposing
forces of destruction and creation.” 



Through The Language Glass
by Guy Deutscher






↘  material samples archive








Research Institute for Matters of Matter is an independent institution, which primary purpose is investigation of matter within the framework of the physical theory of language and making results open to public. The Institute does not follow commercial purposes and supports ideas interchange in every possible way.

Questions, inquiries, collaborations:
matterofmatters@gmail.com



Texts, illustrations and diagrams by Research Institute for Matters of Matter (if not stated otherwise). Please contact us in case you would like to use or quote our materials.



©Research Institute for Matters of Matter